Viewing entries in
FDA

CMS’ New Coding Policy Will Speed up Reimbursement for New Drugs and Devices

CMS’ New Coding Policy Will Speed up Reimbursement for New Drugs and Devices

When developing new medical device and drug products, it is important to understand how the product will be adopted and paid for in the marketplace. The development of new drugs and devices involves countless hours researching, testing, modifying, iterating, and testing some more… In larger companies, whole teams of people also dedicate the same effort into developing a market access plan—meaning careful planning for manufacturing, distribution, and insurance contracting.  This strategic planning can be overlooked in start-up biotech companies operating on limited resources and which are squarely focused on innovating new technologies.

FDA: Abbreviated, Special and Traditional 510(k) Clearance Applications

FDA: Abbreviated, Special and Traditional 510(k) Clearance Applications

The FDA has just issued four final guidance documents related to the 510(k) clearance applications for medical devices.  The Guidance documents can be found here, and they describe the FDA’s current thinking on special 510(k) clearance programs such as the Abbreviated application and the newly established “Special 510(k)” program. 

Out of the Box:  The FDA Wants to Understand How Prescribers Consider Serious Drug Safety Information.

Out of the Box: The FDA Wants to Understand How Prescribers Consider Serious Drug Safety Information.

We see the advertisements on the television, the music plays and people start barbequing, playing frisbee with their dogs, or walking through their neighborhood greeting neighbors with a smile.  A voiceover describes some medical condition, and then, they tell you that there’s a drug that may help.  After about thirty seconds of hearing about how the drug may help treat a specific condition, the voice starts to tell you all the things that may go wrong. 

Breakthrough Devices: CMS Removes Hurdles and Increases Payments for New Technology Add-On Payments Under the IPPS Final Rule

Breakthrough Devices: CMS Removes Hurdles and Increases Payments for New Technology Add-On Payments Under the IPPS Final Rule

Hospitals and medical device manufacturers will both benefit from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) finalization of the 2020 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) Final Rule (“Final Rule”) scheduled to be published on August 16, 2019.  In an effort to increase Medicare beneficiaries’ access to innovative medical technologies, CMS has finalized certain changes to the “new technology add-on payment” “(NTAP) application and payment processes under the Final Rule. This change is likely to encourage hospital adoption of new technologies, which is intended to spur innovation and additional investment in these technologies.

UPDATE: VDACS Food Safety Program Releases CBD Manufacturing Requirements for Virginia Industrial Hemp Processors

UPDATE: VDACS Food Safety Program Releases CBD Manufacturing Requirements for Virginia Industrial Hemp Processors

Following its July 15th letter to Virginia Industrial Hemp Processors (“Processors”) notifying them of Governor Ralph Northam’s recent directive regarding the manufacture of CBD in Virginia, the VDACS Food Safety Program (the “FSP”) sent a letter to Processors on Friday, July 26th setting forth guidelines for Processors to follow when manufacturing cannabidiol (“CBD”) products intended for human consumption (the “Food Safety Letter”).

Virginia's Cannabis Industry: A 2019 Legislative Session Rundown

Virginia's Cannabis Industry: A 2019 Legislative Session Rundown

In Virginia’s 2019 General Assembly (GA) Session, five of six proposed cannabis-related bills passed and will soon reach the desk of the Governor, ushering in some significant changes to the Commonwealth’s medical cannabis program. Among them, allowing full therapeutic-strength medical cannabis preparations, and the addition of physician assistants and nurse practitioners to the list of providers permitted to make medical cannabis recommendations.

Congress Votes to Legalize Low-THC Cannabis (Hemp)

Congress Votes to Legalize Low-THC Cannabis (Hemp)

On December 12, 2018, Congress passed the 2018 Farm Bill (The “Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018” or the “Bill”), which includes provisions that exempt Cannabis plants with lower than 0.3% THC content (also called “Hemp”) from the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Once signed into law, the Farm Bill effectively legalizes the production, commercialization, and interstate shipment and sale of hemp and hemp-derived products like cannabidiol or “CBD”. Each state (including Indian Tribes and U.S. Territories) will eventually be able to regulate hemp production like any other agricultural commodity, as long as the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) approves its plan to monitor and regulate the plant’s production.

The 21st Century Cures Act and the Future of Healthcare

The 21st Century Cures Act and the Future of Healthcare

The Cures Act is aimed at modernizing and personalizing healthcare by encouraging innovation and streamlining the process for discovery, development, and delivery of new treatments and technologies to those suffering from illness. Importantly, the legislation provides for significant funding to advance these goals, to the tune of $4.8 billion to the National Institutes of Health ("NIH"), $500 million to the Food & Drug Administration ("FDA"), and $1 billion in grants to states for opioid abuse prevention and treatment. This article will provide an overview of key components of the Cures Act and highlight implications for the future of healthcare.

CLIENT ALERT: FDA Pilot Program Seeking Software Developers

CLIENT ALERT: FDA Pilot Program Seeking Software Developers

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is currently accepting requests from medical software developers to participate in a precertification pilot program that is scheduled to begin September 1, 2017.  The program is aimed at developing precertification criteria for software companies that would allow approved companies to engage in a streamlined premarket review process for certain digital health products.  The FDA will accept up to nine participants for the pilot program, which the Agency says will include both large, established software developers and small startup companies.