Viewing entries tagged
HIPAA

Mining and Sharing Healthcare Data: What you need to know

Mining and Sharing Healthcare Data: What you need to know

New technologies in healthcare means new risk to the security and privacy of patient health data. Though most healthcare companies and providers are aware of the need for internal data security, many may not be in compliance when sharing information with third parties. As providers and vendors find new and innovative ways to work together, the need for data sharing will only increase. It is critically important that all parties know when and how protected health information (PHI) is shared, and when patient authorization is required to do so.

OCR Shifts Focus to HIPAA Compliance Enforcement

OCR Shifts Focus to HIPAA Compliance Enforcement

In October, The Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR) shared that future health-care privacy and security audits will shift from an educational focus to an enforcement focus. Previously, OCR performed these audits to educate providers on patient privacy and HIPAA. But now, the priority is enforcement. Instead of relying on complaints and breach notifications, the OCR will be more proactive in identifying problem providers. It’s important for all healthcare provider entities to have a HIPAA compliance plan actively in use. (We can help!)

New HHS Fact Sheet on Direct Liability of Business Associates under HIPAA

New HHS Fact Sheet on Direct Liability of Business Associates under HIPAA

As all health care providers know, the HIPAA Privacy Rule applies to their practice. But because many providers outsource some of their health care activities and/or functions, the HIPAA Privacy Rule also applies to these “business associates".” It is important that providers have assurances in writing that all business associates are appropriately safeguarding patient information and following all HIPAA provisions. The HHS Office for Civil Rights has issued a new fact sheet that lays out all provisions where the business associate would be held directly liable for HIPAA Rule violations.

Do I really need a Healthcare Lawyer?

Do I really need a Healthcare Lawyer?

Healthcare has now surpassed nuclear power and financial services as the most highly regulated industry in the U.S. - and for good reason. The health, safety, and privacy of individual patients and the public at large is at stake.

For better or for worse, there exists a complex web of local, state, and federal laws and regulations that govern the businesses of healthcare providers and healthcare companies - from patient safety and privacy protections, to corporate transactions and contractual relationships. Navigating this complicated landscape requires a deep understanding of the risks and opportunities inherent in the healthcare industry—namely, it requires an experienced healthcare attorney. 

Reduce the Risk of a Healthcare Data Breach with Zero-Step Email Encryption

Reduce the Risk of a Healthcare Data Breach with Zero-Step Email Encryption

This article discusses how you can lower your risk through email encryption, thereby saving your healthcare practice or organization from an expensive data breach. Email encryption can help your organization protect against the most common form of data breach and better comply with HIPAA standards.

What do I need to know about GDPR?

What do I need to know about GDPR?

Beginning on May 25, 2018, HIPAA won’t be the only healthcare data security standard with which U.S. companies have to comply. Medical practices, digital healthcare companies, and vendors (e.g., electronic health records companies, medical billing companies, and cloud services companies) that do business in the healthcare sector and collect data from European citizens will be required to comply with the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”). A recent Reuters article called the implementation of these regulations “the biggest overhaul of online privacy since the birth of the internet.”

How to Secure Your Health Information Against Phishing Attacks

How to Secure Your Health Information Against Phishing Attacks

Earlier this year, a federally qualified health center, Metro Community Provider Network (“MCPN”) paid a $400,000 HIPAA breach penalty related to a 2011 phishing attack. In this attack, several MCPN employees had their email accounts hacked by a phisher who was able to gain access to about 3,200 individuals’ PHI.

Business Associates of Business Associates - Partners Pointer

Business Associates of Business Associates - Partners Pointer

Caitlin Riccobono, Esq., Counsel at Nixon Law Group, develops these routine “Partners Pointers” for the Virginia-based healthcare organization Partners in Healthcare.

Topic: Business Associates of Business Associates

I was asked to address two main questions regarding a Business Associate that is a subcontractor of another Business Associate (we will call this a “Sub-BA”).  First, to what extent is a Sub-BA permitted access to PHI?  Second, what are the Sub-BA’s obligations with respect to safeguarding PHI?

OCR ramping up HIPAA Enforcement for "Small" Breaches

OCR ramping up HIPAA Enforcement for "Small" Breaches

We often advise our clients that one of the criteria separating a “high risk” breach from a “low risk” breach is whether the breach affects more or fewer than 500 individuals. This is because the HHS Office of Civil Rights (which is the HIPAA enforcement arm of HHS) has historically prioritized investigation of and corrective action following breaches affecting in excess of 500 individuals—OCR’s Regional Offices investigate all reported breaches involving the PHI of 500 or more individuals. However, OCR recently announced that it would be teaming up with its regional office staff to more widely investigate HIPAA breaches affecting fewer than 500 individuals—sending a strong signal to covered entities and business associates that no one is “safe” from repercussions emanating from a HIPAA breach.

How Should My Practice Respond to a Breach?

How Should My Practice Respond to a Breach?

Despite the risk of experiencing a HIPAA breach exceeding 89%, fewer than half of healthcare organizations have formal incident response plans and procedures. When an actual or suspected breach occurs, it is vital for covered entities and business associates to have a simple, streamlined, and expeditious plan to respond. These breaches can be anything from a lost thumb drive or laptop to a sophisticated cyber-attack, but a good breach response plan will be flexible enough to work in a variety of circumstances. There are standard responses that the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of Civil Rights (the government entity that polices HIPAA compliance) (OCR) expects to see when health data has been compromised. These include protocols for investigation, mitigation, and notification of affected individuals.